Sunday, June 10, 2012

RHINEBECK AMCA MEET, NY

While you'd think an Antique Motorcycle Club of America show and sale would be dominated by Harleys (and there were plenty...), I was impressed by the sheer variety of interesting machines for sale at Rhinebeck, the 'grandaddy' of the East Coast old bike swaps.  This Rumi Gentleman Junior 'dans son jus' is not only rare, but complete except for the exhaust...an amazing find for someone.  Apparently is sat in an antique shop for quite a while...love the original Dell'Orto carbs with shared remote float.
Mosquito abatement via Velocette MAC...
The H-D speedo guy...
This fellow rode in mid-day on Friday, and the closer I looked at his Sportster XLCH, the better I liked it.  Ceriani road race forks, dual-plug heads, an aluminum oil tank in the shape of the standard steel item...sweet.
Spark plugs where they oughtn't be...a clue to hidden performance
Nothing 'square' about this fellow but his handlebars...
Gorgeous 1924 Brough Superior SS80 with JAP engine...
...and nickel plated everything.
Flattery will get you everywhere; this gent, formerly of the SF Bay Area, found the image for his tattoo on The Vintagent...
This one came from a Ducati catalog
Improving the lines of a BSA A65...
...and giving Rollie Free wings (and breasts!)
Triumph Trident drag bike
Love this electric Indian homage, for when walking gets to be a chore (Rhinebeck is a big show...)
Sweet HD Knucklehead custom, with unique twin-barrel Schebler carbs
The kids are lovin' their customs...flatties, Pans, Knucks, Shovels...all good, even Yam XS650s!
Don't strain your memory, just a fun pastiche...
 William Eggers builds replicas of the 1867 Roper steam velocipede and the Daimler 4-wheel petrol-engine 'motorcycle' (ish...it has four wheels, and doesn't rate as a moto in my book, even though every 'history of motorcycles' lists it as first, because it has two big wheels in a line, and ran on petrol.  It was the Roper, and Michaux, who were first; no training wheels.)

1911 Indian, in fantastic condition
More chops, this time Yamaha powered
Beautiful original-paint 1936 Indian Chief
Need a Royal Enfield engine?
Cycle-pacers are better recognized these days as an important part of moto-history...they were the first motorcycle racers (when pacers ditched the bicycles, and raced each other!)
Benelli Monkey
Nice Victoria Bermeister...Moto Guzzi were not the only transverse v-twin; in fact, many other machines since the 1920s used this layout.
Original-paint BMW R51/3, which ran like a top

Buzz Kanter and his JDH Harley 'Cannonball' entry.  The sound of thunder!  I envied the power...I'll be running 1/3 his capacity across country...
Buzz is publisher/editor of American Iron magazine...
1902 Indian 'Camelback' for sale...once again, original paint.  The antique motorcycle community has really 'got the message' that old bikes are best kept original - the collector car world is still dominated by 'magpies' who prefer shiny objects...
Cannonball veteran single-cylinder 1914 Harley...
I get asked a lot what's on my 'list'; OK, I found one.  The Cleveland 4-cylinder was faster than the Indian or Henderson 4s, and looks it - low and compact, like a 1920s café racer...
...and this one happens to be in original paint.  I'm rarely envious, but I admit to greening around this one...

One of Eggers' Daimler replicas; purchased mainly by museums looking for a timeline
Magneto man Doug Wood and his 1927 Velocette KSS
Someone's Dream...
Absolutely the craziest motorcycle seat ever, on this Emblem; there are two further 'sidesaddle' seats behind this 'mom n' pop'...for the kids!

Most AMC dirt racers came to the USofA...
Voilá, a Harley flat twin...
HD Knuckleheads have become crazily popular of late, which means a lot are coming out of hibernation, and they're getting expensive... still, it's good to see so many in riding condition

13 comments:

Peter Watson said...

I know it's what I said but I actually linked over to another site and found the pic of the triumph racer that found its way to my arm. But linked directly from you!
Now I've achieved the fame I've so richly deserved!
Nice to meet you!
PW

Anonymous said...

Fantastic report Paul and very nice motorcycles !! the Indian 1902 oulala

- Vincent C.

Anonymous said...

Nice, Dana's Velo clearing her throat, I was there you captured it, Thanx for sharin'

Walt L.

Anonymous said...

Great article Paul!

David M.

Anonymous said...

Paul, good to met you@ R/beck!!RR250 in trailer!!

Brian K.

Anonymous said...

Enjoyed walking part of the field with you Paul.

Recambios para moto said...

Paul, great report. And very nice motorcycles!! If you need spare parts for your motorcycles can visit www.paddockmotor.com

Anonymous said...

Fabulous report, as usual. Thank you.
So.. what else is on your list besides the Cleveland?

john shuck said...

That's my Dream in the photo. cleaning out the shed to make some room. Arrived with a pickup load of Brit and Honda parts and left with nothing. Great show..

Greg Ess said...

I find the identification of the Camelback as a 1902 model year kind of perplexing.

My understanding was that 1901 was when the prototypes were built. 1902 was spent readying for series production, and several design deficiancies were identified in the early production models, which resulted in all of them being updated, with the first bike available as 1903 models.

Net/net - there are no 1902s.

OrangAkaun said...

WHOAA!!!

So many classic bike. I love them all!

Anonymous said...

Hello, Nice photos from an enjoyable Meet. I just wanted to add the following: I too saw that cool electric-trike "homage" to Indian Motorcycles....and thought it should be mentioned that the colorful gentleman riding that thing, is none other than Butch Baer, a LEGEND in the world of Indians. Just Google
his name! Thanks.

Anonymous said...

The "1902" Camelback Indian was listed as a "1908" by it's owner who told me that the cycle was a combination of 1906 through 1908 parts. The battery box is just an old can that appears to the unsuspecting to be real. The cycle doesn't run. He displayed the cycle and the 1911 Indian at Oley and Rhinebeck. So, the 1908 is not what it appears to be. Buyer beware!